Professor David Jones

David Albert Jones was born in 1966 in Leicester and brought up in Wrexham, North Wales where he attended the local co-educational comprehensive school. Both parents were teachers. He read Natural Sciences and Philosophy at Cambridge (BA), Theology at Oxford (BA, MSt, DPhil). 

He is currently Director of the Anscombe Bioethics Centre, in Oxford. The Centre was founded in 1977 by the Catholic bishops of England and Wales (it was previously known as the Linacre Centre for Healthcare Ethics) and is the oldest national Bioethics research centre in the UK, and one of the oldest in the world.

He was previously Professor of Bioethics and Director of the Centre for Bioethics and Emerging Technologies, at St Mary’s University College, Twickenham, where he remains a Visiting Professor. Prof Jones’ doctorate was published in 2007 as Approaching the End (Oxford University Press). His previous book The Soul of the Embryo (Continuum) was short-listed for the Michael Ramsey Prize 2007. Prof Jones is Vice-chair of the Ministry of Defence Research Ethics Committee, is external examiner for the Diploma on Medicine and Philosophy run by the Society of Apothecaries, is on the national reference group of the Liverpool Care Pathway and was on a working party of the General Medical Council which helped draft its 2010 guidance on treatment and care towards the end of life.

His most recent publication is co-editor (with Dr Calum MacKellar) of Chimera’s Children: Ethical, Philosophical and Religious Perspectives on Human-Nonhuman Experimentation (Continuum).

 Related Sessions

Saturday 1 November 2008, 10.30am Upper Gulbenkian Gallery
The Battle for Truth


 Publications

(Continuum, 2012)
Angels: A Very Short Introduction (OUP, 2011)
Approaching the End: a theological exploration of death and dying Oxford: OUP 2007.
The Soul of the Embryo: An enquiry into the status of the human embryo in the Christian tradition London: Continuum 2004.


 Festival Buzz

"…the most interesting, diverse, serious and argumentative audience imaginable."
Prof Sir Bernard Crick