Bookshop Barnie at the Battle: 'Why We Disagree about Climate Change'

Saturday 31 October, 1.30pm until 3.00pm, Lecture Theatre 2

Austin Williams presents a special Battle Bookshop Barnie with Mike Hulme, founding director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, on his latest book Why We Disagree About Climate Change: Understanding Controversy, Inaction and Opportunity.

Hulme has set the cat amongst the pigeons by rejecting the notion that there is a ‘consensus’ regarding the science of climate change. He points out there are even disagreements about the nature of scientific knowledge itself. He is also opposed to the politicisation of science. But is he really just worried about the use of ‘the language of fear and apocalypse’? After all, he suggests that we should ‘harness climate change to give new expression to some of the… values that matter to us’. In other words, is this a criticism of the climate change debate… or just spinning the same message in a more pragmatic way?

Challenge the author to explain why we must all ‘come to terms with climate change’

You are not expected to have read the book… but hopefully you will buy a signed copy at the bookstall if you’re convinced.

Listen to the session audio…

Other formats are available here

Speakers
Professor Mike Hulme
professor of climate change, University of East Anglia; founding director, Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research; author, Why We Disagree About Climate Change: understanding controversy, inaction and opportunity

Chair:
Austin Williams
associate professor in architecture, XJTLU University, Suzhou, China; director, Future Cities Project; convenor, Bookshop Barnies; founding member of New Narratives


Produced by
Austin Williams associate professor in architecture, XJTLU University, Suzhou, China; director, Future Cities Project; convenor, Bookshop Barnies; founding member of New Narratives
Recommended readings
Climate change: no Eden, no apocalypse

Climate change is everywhere. Not only is the physical climate changing, but the idea of climate change is now active across the full range of human endeavours. Climate change has moved from being a predominantly physical phenomenon to being a social one, in the process reshaping the way we think about ourselves, our societies and humanity's place on Earth.

Mike Hulme, New Scientist, 7 September 2009

Why We Disagree About Climate Change: Understanding Controversy, Inaction and Opportunity

Climate change is not ‘a problem’ waiting for ‘a solution’. It is an environmental, cultural and political phenomenon which is re-shaping the way we think about ourselves, our societies and humanity’s place on Earth.

Mike Hulme, Cambridge University Press, 30 April 2009

Amid the financial storm: redirecting climate change

What impact will the global economic downturn have on arguments about climate change? The way to an answer lies through ourselves as much as the weather.

Mike Hulme, openDemocracy, 1 November 2008

Session partners